Health Specialist Adviced Lifestyle Medicine

Health Specialist Adviced Lifestyle Medicine

Rochester is perceived worldwide for its top of the line medical facilities. Presently, the city is finding a way to improve wellbeing with lifestyle medicine, including nutrition, movement and stress management.

“Some people think, well, I’m on medicine so I don’t need a lifestyle change. But in reality, medications have their limitations. If we use a combined approach we often produce very superior results,” said Dr. Neil Nedley.

Dr. Nedley runs programs for individuals with depression and anxiety. He said that lifestyle changes can make a huge difference.

He was asked to share his findings at the third Community of Wellness Symposium in Rochester, sponsored by Rochester Clinic and Lotus Health Foundation

“We’re not against the western civilized approach, but it can be used in a complementary way,” he said.

His patients are advised to change their exercise habits, sleep cycles, thought patterns and diet.

“Many people are not getting enough Omega 3, particularly the plant-based Omega 3; that’s very helpful,” Nedley said.

Dr. Neal Barnard with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine spoke specifically about food and wellness at the symposium.

“What we really want to do is have a diet that is really rich in four things: vegetables, fruits, grains and beans. What we want to move away from are the meats, the dairy products, the eggs that a lot of us grew up with before we really knew the hazards,” Barnard said.

He said the type of food people choose to eat can greatly impact the brain.

“Many people have imagined that Alzheimer’s is just related to old age or genes,” Barnard said. “But we’ve found that the most important things could be the food that you choose.”

He suggests that those wanting to change their eating habits should set aside a short period of time to commit to healthy food.

“If you haven’t been having your vegetables or fruits for a while, now is the time to bring them in,” Barnard said. “Set aside the animal products for a three-week period. You are going to be a vegetarian or vegan and at the end of those three weeks you find you feel so much better you want to stick with it.”

Rochester is perceived worldwide for its top of the line medical facilities. Presently, the city is finding a way to improve wellbeing with lifestyle medicine, including nutrition, movement and stress management.

“Some people think, well, I’m on medicine so I don’t need a lifestyle change. But in reality, medications have their limitations. If we use a combined approach we often produce very superior results,” said Dr. Neil Nedley.

Dr. Nedley runs programs for individuals with depression and anxiety. He said that lifestyle changes can make a huge difference.

He was asked to share his findings at the third Community of Wellness Symposium in Rochester, sponsored by Rochester Clinic and Lotus Health Foundation

“We’re not against the western civilized approach, but it can be used in a complementary way,” he said.

His patients are advised to change their exercise habits, sleep cycles, thought patterns and diet.

“Many people are not getting enough Omega 3, particularly the plant-based Omega 3; that’s very helpful,” Nedley said.

Dr. Neal Barnard with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine spoke specifically about food and wellness at the symposium.

“What we really want to do is have a diet that is really rich in four things: vegetables, fruits, grains and beans. What we want to move away from are the meats, the dairy products, the eggs that a lot of us grew up with before we really knew the hazards,” Barnard said.

He said the type of food people choose to eat can greatly impact the brain.

“Many people have imagined that Alzheimer’s is just related to old age or genes,” Barnard said. “But we’ve found that the most important things could be the food that you choose.”

He suggests that those wanting to change their eating habits should set aside a short period of time to commit to healthy food.

“If you haven’t been having your vegetables or fruits for a while, now is the time to bring them in,” Barnard said. “Set aside the animal products for a three-week period. You are going to be a vegetarian or vegan and at the end of those three weeks you find you feel so much better you want to stick with it.”

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